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Do I have To Have A Party Every Year For My Kids Birthday?

Every year when there birthday comes around, children get excited. The magic is still alive for them with every passing year. The question many parents find themselves asking, is if it is okay to skip the birthday party this year. Maybe your child is young, and you think they won't remember the event, but will still enjoy a gift or two in the moment. Ultimately you just want to be a good parent and balance your child's happiness and upbringing with the checkbook. Here are our thoughts on kids birthday parties and the frequency at which they should occur.


What Is The Goal Of Throwing A Birthday Party?

Birthday parties are a great way to get together with friends and family to celebrate someone you all love and care about, and to show your support for them on a special day. Children don't have as many landmark days yet as adults do, and the day they look forward to the most is their birthday. A day that is all about them, where they can be the center of attention, and receive gifts that they may not throughout the rest of the year. While it is good to celebrate your child, spending exorbitant amounts of money on them every year on this day from their infancy on isn't the answer either. Getting to know your child, what makes them happy, and pairing that with developmental gains from socializing with other people and more can help you find what works. Every child is different!


Will My Child Remember If I Don't Throw Them A Party?

Generally, adults can recall events from ages 3-4. From ages 0-2 you should be in the clear if you don't decide to throw them a party, as a new parent, you will likely have your hands full anyway. If they are older they will likely remember, but in some cases they may not care if you skip a year here and there What they will remember and care about is whether or not you make an effort to make them happy. Just like any other kind of party, the scale and frequency is entirely up to you. If every year doesn't seem feasible for a large production, maybe every so often you skip the party and get them a special gift, or take them some place special. Older kids may not always appreciate the enthusiasm of a party, and may just want a gift or some entertainment.


Other Parents Do It Every Year. I Feel Like I Have To.

Your child may expect a party every year because their friends have one every year. Children may not be the most understanding when it comes to comparing you with their friends parents. You may need to reason with them and find a way to make them forget the idea that you are going to do what everyone else's parents do. If having a party every year is important to them to the exclusion of all else, a small party in the absence of one at all can help them feel appreciated.


What Is The Reason You Don't Want To Celebrate Their Birthday Every Year?


When deciding whether or not to have a party every year, it's important to consider your individual reasons. Are you worried about the cost? Do you think too much emphasis is being placed on the celebration? Maybe you don't feel like there's enough time in your schedule for all of the preparations and planning necessary to pull off an event that will wow them and their friends. Whatever your reason, consider expressing it openly and respectfully to them.


If money or time is the concern, maybe each year you could start thinking about their birthday further in advance to allow yourself to build savings gradually, and have more time to plan. If this is still out of the question, keep reading!


If you think too much emphasis is placed on this day, and it does not deserve a full on celebration, keep in mind that before you know it they will be out of the house, and fond memories will be something you cling to. Find other things or ways to celebrate and spend quality time with your child, to make them happy. Celebrate their accomplishments, reward them for positive behavior in bad situations. Nobody should tell you how to raise your child, but it is important they don't feel ignored, unappreciated or overlooked.


Celebrate Only Select Birth Years With A Party

Single out major birthday years with a party! You could even just have larger celebrations at ages 4,5,6, throw a lucky number 7 party, and then wait until ages 10,13,16,18 to celebrate entrance into double digits, teenagerhood, sweet 16, and becoming an adult. You could even ask them which ages they want to celebrate most, have a conversation with them!


The important thing is that your child doesn't feel overlooked. If they have important years to look forward to they may be more likely to understand why this year you didn't make a whole production of it.


Alternate Party Years

If you are not able to, or don't want to throw a birthday party every year for your child, maybe you decide to throw larger celebrations every other year. In the off years, if party planning takes it out of you, you could plan for a larger gift, or take them someplace you know they will enjoy. You could even still have smaller gatherings with just the members of your household their favorite food, and some decorations.


Keep The Element of Surprise

Even if you let your children know in advance the degree to which their birthday will be celebrated on a given year, it is important to keep some surprises in store, if even on a smaller level. This will keep them on their toes, and not have them feeling like everything is all planned out, and decided.


Bring Your Kids Out To Caddie Shak For Their Birthday

If this is not the year you want to celebrate with us, that's fine! Reserve for next year, and get ahead of the curve! We are an affordable kids birthday party venue, and we can handle all the food, and we certainly have the entertainment under control. Book now, mark your calendar for next year at Caddieshak! We can accommodate large numbers of guests and small! We look forward to seeing you whenever you come to take advantage of our attractions and have a great time celebrating your child's birthday!

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